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toward recovery today, one week after hurricane sandy hit. but for many in new jersey and new york, normal routines are still a longay off.lo we have two reports, beginning with an overview from kwame holman.e >> reporter: it was the closest think to a full-scale morning commute since the storm hit a week ago. it taxed transit systems to the limit in new york city, connecticut and parts of new rsey >> we keep missing trains because it's so packed you can't enter the trainsrs >> reporter: lines stretched for blocks as thousands of people tried to get to work. trains from new jersey to new york remained out, but key subway lines connecting manhattan to brooklyn under the east river werepen. and the statten island ferry was running. >> i don'think it's really normal for anyone right now.'t we have so much on our minds right now especially for those who have family that lost everything, you know. not normal yet. r:eporter: the trarns it challenges came on top of a cold night for thousands of people still with t power with temperatures dropping into the 30s.th >> we have hot soup, hot c
: now, a report on the recovery from the superstorm sandy. new york governor andrew cuomo said today he intends to ask the federal government for at least $30 billion in aid. new jersey is still tallying its losses, and damages in the region are expected to exceed $50 billion. schools officially reopened today in one community along the jersey shore. but for the past week, teachers have been already hard at work, helping students deal with the aftermath of the storms. special correspondent john tulenko of learning matters filed this story from the town of belmar. >> reporter: hurricane sandy tore into belmar, new jersey. >> belmar was one of the towns you would continually hear about on the radio. families reported seeing four, five, six-foot wall of water >> how are you? reporter: lisa hannah is assistant principal at belmar's one elementary school. many of her students are recent immigrants. most of their families had nowhere else to go. >> i don't think anyone was really prepared for what happened >> reporter: inside this house three children and their parents were counting on luck.
can find more and the reach out and read program lost thousands of books after hurricane sandy last month. >> brown: finally tonight, the college football season is reaching a climax of rivalries and conference championship games and its basketball season is now underway. but much of the action in college sports these days is away from the field or the court, as schools change affiliations and leagues. in the last 18 months some 30 colleges have made moves. among the most prominent, the university of louisville's departure from the big east to join the atlantic coast conference or a.c.c. and two eastern schools headed to the big ten, traditionally a midwest-based conference: the university of maryland is leaving the a.c.c. and rutgers is departing from the big east. what's going on? sportswriter and author john feinstein joins me now. john, first of all, for the uninitiated, explain the role of these conferences traditionally. how do they work and how do they divide up the college world? >> well, jeff, conferences were designed initially to take schools that were together geographic
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3